Press

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Richard II
By William Shakespeare
"Katrin Hilbe has a special gift for making the most of the materials she works with. Here she brings to life the characters in Shakespeare's play with emphasis on the language, which clearly is some of the Bard's richest. These C.A.G.E. performances are a special experience."
Susan Hall, Berkshire Fine Arts

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"Fantastic, how the director manages to explore condition of human bondage with minimal intrusion. The abundance of structure doesn’t allow for looseness or laissez-faire, as the final explosion is the necessary result of the play’s rigid framework. The actors convince through their almost repulsive physicality and facial expressions. At times you’d like to jump up and shout: ´Shut up, you damned…´"
Klaus Koppe, Liechtensteiner Volksblatt

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"Compliment. A performance for almost exclusively very young teenagers - on a Friday afternoon - where the breathless, excited attention is palpable, speaks for itself. It speaks for the play “Shooter” by Sam Graber, who treats the matter of a high school shooting not in a headline-grabbing manner. It speaks for the director Katrin Hilbe, who combines the structural direction of her actors with the risk of presenting connections only to a very attentive audience."
Klaus Koppe, Liechtensteiner Volksblatt

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"Katrin Hilbe treated the difficult subject matter of the rise of gun violence among young people with great sensitivity. (...)The convincing performances of the five actors immersed the viewer in the emotional turmoils of the protagonists, and they suffered their pain with them. The tension, palpable throughout the play, is heightened by Andy Evan Cohen´s intricate sound design, which accentuated important moments at times harshly, at times soothingly. Most probably won´t like to admit it, but the audience remained empathetic to the murderer, the high school shooter, even to the gun fanatic. And we inevitably ask ourselves: How could it come to this?"
Mirjam Kaiser, Liechtensteiner Vaterland

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"The play deliberately asks many questions, all culminating in the one: How can such a thing happen? Given that it was written by a man, performed by men, but directed and designed exclusively by women, this possibly allowed the statements to be even more harsh than intended. A strong play, strong performers and intense direction."
Anita Grüneis, Kultur

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"The director Katrin Hilbe focussed on the dialog and the performances. The entire space belonged to the actors. They didn’t show external action, but rather interior life turned inside out, and therefore they spoke about everything that men usually don’t speak about."
Anita Grüneis, Kultur

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"Director Katrin Hilbe stuck these men into a world of plastic. The scenic design by Sarah Edkins consisted of heavy plastic curtains, with colorful projections on the sides. In the course of the evening the back curtains were opened. The story of the men was presented in two interchanging timelines. It begins at the end and ends at the beginning. In between these two events lies a half a year, in which Jim’s life and his friendships disintegrated. The jumps in time work surprisingly well, also because of the good dialogue and the powerful, authentic performers."
Anita Grüneis, Kultur

"We are left, as is our protagonist, Rustam, asking God for forgiveness, mercy and guidance through a painful and complex labyrinth. We too create our own cycles of intolerance and are often unable to celebrate the brotherhood of mankind. In Hilbe's hands, Pfirrmann's play is both arresting and wrenching."
Rachel de Aragon, Berkshire Fine Arts

"Hilbe's clarity keeps the focus on the impending decision. Violence awaits. The heavy duffel, which Rustam tells his brother contains gym weights is discreetly ignored in the corner of the dining room. In a context of repeated emotional surprise, Hilbe maintains perfect pace and timing."
Rachel de Aragon, Berkshire Fine Arts