Fremd bin ich eingezogen…

by Antonia Beerman
Performed: - Konzilstrasse 11, Konstanz, Germany, Oct 23 - Dec 25, 2015
Category:

“I came here as a stranger…” A musical trip through Schubert’s song cycle Winterreise (Winter Journey) and Georg Büchner´s novella Lenz.

Not a linear narrative, not really a narrative at all, but an exploration into emotional trauma. 3 performers, all speak, one also sings, one also plays piano, they are 3 and they are one, experiencing loss, rootlessness, isolation, despair.

Cast:

Lenz/Wanderer 1, 2, 3: Wolfgang Erkwoh, Sophie Nawara, Vincent Heppner

Creative Team:

Script and Dramaturgy: Antonia Beermann

Direction: Katrin Hilbe

Musical direction: Sophie Nawara, Andreas Kohl

Scenic & Costume Design: Verena Neumann

Video: Max Fürth

Lighting Design: Thomas Eggers

Assistant Director: Armin Peterka

Assistant set designer: Bianka Wilk

Stage Manager: Claudia Schiller

Photography: Björn Jansen




Press

Quote the progam of the city theatre of Konstanz: “In times of enormous streams of refugees and migrations, director Katrin Hilbe tells a story of searches and travels without return, via Schubert and Büchner.“ (...) I leave the theatre in thought. The performance is deeply moving. The fate of the protagonists invariably leads to reflection. The subject matter of how we deal with the “Strange” and “Search” offers a broad spectrum involving every one of us. Katrin Hilbe and all parties involved have succeeded with bravura in their Winter Journey. The performance draws you in completely from beginning to end. It runs deep. All collaborators have succeeded in uniting their particular arts to one big union. I am thankful for this experience.
Jasmine Seywald, Seeflaneur

By declaiming the text rhythmically, repetition of Leitmotifs and changing dynamics, Büchner’s text is moved close to music; Schubert’s songs on the other hand, through this surprisingly sober interpretation, equally acquire a declamatory quality. It seems completely natural what Erkwoh and Nawara create with the “Winter Journey”, almost something from Brecht/Weill that often gets under your skin. (...) Hilbe’s business is the essential. Perhaps we did get too comfortable over the years, in our armchairs with our book shelves or in the concert hall. Melancholy can be quite soothing, after all. These three players at the stage’s edge end all this. When they have to they’ll scream text and music into your ears: listen, this may cost our life!
Bettina Schröm, Südkurier